Our Impact

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Our Impact

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CREATING THE NEXT GENERATION OF CONSERVATION LEADERS

EPI invests in youth, education, and conservation - empowering the next generation of conservation leaders to take an active role in their communities.



30,000 Teens
& Teachers

have participated in EPI programs.

Each year thousands of students, both local to the program site and visiting from around the world, join EPI on multi-day field courses. Our courses combine hands-on field science and conservation, inquiry-based learning, and authentic cultural exchange that inspire and empower youth to take an active role in conservation.



More than 70%
of our participants are underserved youth living near our project sites.

Lasting conservation depends on local community support and engagement.


"I now share my insights with everyone so they will understand the impact that one single act against nature can have."

Adrian Ramirez, local EPI Costa Rica student

Nest temperature determines hatchling sex - warmer temps mean more female hatchlings.

Redefining the Classroom

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Less than 1% of fertile leatherback eggs will reach adulthood.

Lifelong Stewards

EPI alumni are ecologically literate citizens engaging in positive environmental behaviors in their communities.

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Surviving hatchlings will grow from 1.5 oz at birth to more than 1,000 lbs as an adult!

Conservation Partnerships

EPI participants engage in data collection with our scientific partners, contributing to conservation efforts throughout the Americas.

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15-25 years after birth, female leatherbacks return to their birth beach to lay their own eggs.

The EPI Ripple Effect

Lasting conservation results depend on a unique combination of ecologically literate citizens, local community engagement, and hands-on conservation with effective institutions.

Support a Local Student
LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR IMPACT AT EACH OF OUR PROGRAM SITES

At Pacuare Beach, where our students work in Costa Rica, 
the predation rate of nesting turtle sites dropped from
98% in 2000,
to less than 1% today.